Throughout the world, places that have been involved in war and/or civil strife often have large minefields that still need clearing.

In 2013, it was estimated that there was a global average of around nine mine-related deaths every day.  The situation is especially dire in Africa.

Typically, clearing a minefield involves men in body armor walking in very precise lines with metal detectors.

Anything (from a rusty nail to an old ammo cartridge) that sets the detectors off must be investigated before moving on.

A new method of bomb detection using rats, however, is flipping this process on its head.

A Belgian NGO called APOPO has developed a way to train African pouched rats (named for the storage pouch in their cheeks) to sniff out bombs quickly and safely.

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